Howard Weingrad of Davis & Gilbert LLP

Howard Weingrad of Davis & Gilbert LLP

Howard R. Weingrad is a partner in the Advertising, Marketing & Promotions; Entertainment, Media & Sports; Intellectual Property and Digital Media, Technology & Privacy Practice Groups of Davis & Gilbert.  He counsels leading advertising and media companies in all aspects inherent in the creation, production and distribution of regional, national and global advertising campaigns.

Mr. Weingrad has been recognized as a leading lawyer for advertising law by Chambers USA: America’s Leading Lawyers for Business for 12 consecutive years (2007-2018), particularly for his experience with matters involving unions and the Screen Actors Guild. Mr. Weingrad has also been recognized by The Legal 500 United States for 10 consecutive years (2009-2018) in the area of advertising and marketing. He has also been recognized by The Best Lawyers in America in advertising law for nine consecutive years (2011-2019).

In addition to handling a wide range of copyright, trademark, unfair competition, rights of privacy and publicity, music licensing and other intellectual property issues, a significant portion of Mr. Weingrad’s practice is devoted to broadcast and digital advertising production matters, including negotiating and structuring agreements governing the use of celebrity talent and commercial productions, and advising on complex social media advertising matters. Mr. Weingrad is one of the country’s leading experts in matters involving the complex provisions and implications of the Screen Actors Guild and other advertising and entertainment industry collective bargaining agreements. Since 2014, Mr. Weingrad has been an annual guest lecturer at a Tulane University “Business of Music” class focusing on music in advertising and the synergy between bands and brands.

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When Does “Copying” a Photograph of a Building Constitute Copyright Infringement?

A recent decision from a Pennsylvania federal court underscores that there is generally no copyright protection in an actual building or a skyline of buildings; instead, the protection is in the particular photograph or rendering of the building. Creating an original depiction of a building or skyline that is not substantially similar to the photograph … Continue Reading
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